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Voice Department

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Devon Morin

Teaching Artist Statement
My teaching style is to focus on tailoring the lesson to the student in front of me. Each student will learn about age appropriate technique, physical alignment, breathing, and the structures in the body that allow us to produce sound. I am interested in providing my students with a varied repertoire and I love the chance to explore different styles of music. At the same time I want to make sure that each student’s musicianship is strong. My lessons include ear-training and assigned listening outside of the lesson; there is a huge volume of beautiful and interesting music available to us now and I want my students to appreciate the complete history of the music we study. We are very fortunate to study and perform music and I want every student I work with to share in this opportunity.

Teaching Bio
Baritone Devon Morin holds bachelor degrees in Vocal Performance and Music Education from the University of Rhode Island, and a Masters of Vocal Performance from the Manhattan School of Music. He has worked in many facets of music education, from being the Music Director of musicals and theatre works, to teaching in a rewarding classroom setting. He has particular interest and experience in the changing male voice; having taught many workshops in area middle and high schools and working with changing voices privately. Devon has been teaching voice since 2011, and joined South Shore Conservatory’s faculty in 2016.

Performance Bio
Celebrated for his “brilliant” and “booming” baritone, Devon Morin performs frequently as a soloist and ensemble member in Opera, Contemporary Music, and Early Music throughout the United States. Onstage, he has performed the roles of Sam (Trouble in Tahiti), Oloferne (La Giuditta), Papageno (Die Zauberflоte), and the title roles in Gianni Schicchi, Signor Deluso, Le Carnaval Mascarade and Dido and Aeneas. With a particular love for Handel’s operas and oratorios, he has sung Tirenio (Il Pastor Fido), Argante (Rinaldo), Manoah (Samson), Farasmane (Radamisto), and the bass solo in Messiah. In concert, he has sung the baritone solos in Faure’s Requiem, Haydn’s Paukenmesse, Vaughan William’s Five Mystical Songs and Fantasia on Christmas Carols, Finzi’s In Terra Pax, Carmina Burana, Bach’s Weihnachts-Oratorium and the title role in Elijah. As an ensemble member he has performed with the Boston Lyric Opera, the Schola Cantorum at St. Stephen’s (Providence, RI), Odyssey Opera, the Tanglewood Festival Chorus and the Cantata Singers in Boston. Devon has taken part in the Baroque Opera Workshop at Queen’s College, the Amherst Early Music Festival Opera Project and Winter Workshop, and the Manhattan Opera Studio Summer Festival. He has been a vocal apprentice at the Nahant Music Festival and a Choral Scholar with the Oratorio Society of New York, the Berkshire Choral Festival, and Trinity Church (Newport, RI). He has performed with Opera in Williamsburg, Opera Providence, Salt Marsh Opera, the Blacksburg Master Chorale, the Masterworks Chorale, Harvard pro Musica, and the Nashua Choral Society. Devon has performed in many world class venues including Carnegie Hall, Boston’s Symphony Hall, Jordan Hall, the Boston Opera House, St. John the Divine (NYC), Marsh Chapel (Boston), the Temple of Dendur at the Metropolitan Museum of Art and at Tanglewood. Devon was a semifinalist for The American Prize in Voice Friedrich & Virginia Schorr Memorial Award (Art Song and Oratorio) and in 2012 was the runner up for the NATS Artist Awards Competition. A passionate educator, he is currently a part of the voice faculty at South Shore Conservatory and the Rhode Island Philharmonic Music School. Devon earned his Master’s in Vocal Performance from the Manhattan School of Music and Bachelors in Vocal Performance and Music Education from the University of Rhode Island. Devon joined South Shore Conservatory in 2016.

photo: ©Denise Maccaferri